Jim Schmid’s Trail Quote of the Day #1073 – Sept 20, 2018

Jim-Schmid-Coastal-Rail-Trail-Solana-Beach-CA-8-9-18

Jim-Schmid-Coastal-Rail-Trail-Solana-Beach-CA-8-9-18

Rail-trails are trails constructed on abandoned railroad corridors converted to recreational use or ‘railbanked’ for possible future rail use. They can be very short to hundreds of miles long. Typically surfaced in crushed stone or paved, their moderate grades make rail-trails popular with bicyclists, walkers, and others.

—ROGER MOORE and THOMAS ROSS, Trails and Recreational Greenways: Corridors of Benefits, Parks & Recreation, January 1998


Click to find over 2,000 additional Trail Quotes  arranged loosely into 60 subjects. I want the Trail Quotes to be a readable source for inspiring, challenging, and amusing information and knowledge; as well as a reliable, easy-to-use reference work for finding the precise wording, author, date, and source of the trail quotation.

Advertisements

Jim Schmid’s Trail Quote of the Day #1035 – August 13, 2018

Jim-Schmid's-mtn-bike-Riverfront-Park-Columbia-SC-1-26-18

Jim-Schmid’s-mtn-bike-Riverfront-Park-Columbia-SC-1-26-18

Multiple-use recreation trails or ‘multi-use trails’ are generic terms for what many people call trails or greenways. These trails are built to high standards, are usually 10-feet wide, asphalt or concrete paved, and designed for many types of use. Bicycling, walking, running, in-line skating, and other nonmotorized uses are typical on multi-use trails, and they are frequently very heavily used.

—ROGER MOORE and THOMAS ROSS, Trails and Recreational Greenways: Corridors of Benefits, Parks & Recreation, January 1998


Click to find over 2,000 additional Trail Quotes  arranged loosely into 60 subjects. I want the Trail Quotes to be a readable source for inspiring, challenging, and amusing information and knowledge; as well as a reliable, easy-to-use reference work for finding the precise wording, author, date, and source of the trail quotation.

Jim Schmid’s Trail Quote of the Day #997- July 6, 2018

Sandra-Schmid-on-litter-pickup-on-Florida-Trail-in-Aucilla-WMA-2007

Sandra-Schmid-on-litter-pickup-on-Florida-Trail-in-Aucilla-WMA-2007

Backcountry trails, sometimes called ‘single-track’ or primitive trails, are generally unsurfaced natural routes that range from narrow treadways to carefully planned and elaborately constructed (but natural-looking) thoroughfares. Attention to slopes and effective drainage is essential for the long-term stability of this type of trail.

—ROGER MOORE and THOMAS ROSS, Trails and Recreational Greenways: Corridors of Benefits, Parks & Recreation, January 1998


Click to find over 2,000 additional Trail Quotes  arranged loosely into 60 subjects. I want the Trail Quotes to be a readable source for inspiring, challenging, and amusing information and knowledge; as well as a reliable, easy-to-use reference work for finding the precise wording, author, date, and source of the trail quotation.

Jim Schmid’s Trail Quote of the Day #959- May 29, 2018

MP-100-Jim-Schmid-GAP-PA-10-31-17

MP-100-Jim-Schmid-GAP-PA-10-31-17

A ‘recreational greenway’ is a linear open space that contains a trail(s). Although a greenway trail can take any form, the term generally refers to a high-standard paved trail that accommodates multiple uses.

—ROGER MOORE and THOMAS ROSS, Trails and Recreational Greenways: Corridors of Benefits, Parks & Recreation, January 1998


Click to find over 2,000 additional Trail Quotes  arranged loosely into 60 subjects. I want the Trail Quotes to be a readable source for inspiring, challenging, and amusing information and knowledge; as well as a reliable, easy-to-use reference work for finding the precise wording, author, date, and source of the trail quotation.

Jim Schmid’s Trail Quote of the Day #875- March 6, 2018

Jim-Schmid-with-Bacchetta-Giro-recumbent-on-Prescott-Peavine-Trail-AZ-4-7-2016

Jim-Schmid-with-Bacchetta-Giro-recumbent-on-Prescott-Peavine-Trail-AZ-4-7-2016

Twelve principles for minimizing conflicts on multiple-use trails:
1. Recognize Conflict as Goal Interference – Do not treat conflict as an inherent incompatibility among different trail activities, but rather as goal interference attributed to another’s behavior.
2. Provide Adequate Trail Opportunities – Offer adequate trail mileage and provide opportunities for a variety of trail experiences. This will help reduce congestion and allow users to choose the conditions that are best suited to the experiences they desire.
3. Minimize Number of Contacts in Problem Areas – Each contact among trail users has the potential to result in conflict. So, as a general rule, reduce the number of user contacts whenever possible. This is especially true in congested areas and at trailheads.
4. Involve Users as Early as Possible – Identify the present and likely future users of each trail and involve them in the process of avoiding and resolving conflicts as early as possible, preferably before conflicts occur.
5. Understand User Needs – Determine the motivations, desired experiences, norms, setting preferences, and other needs of the present and likely future users of each trail. This ‘customer’ information is critical for anticipating and managing conflicts.
6. Identify the Actual Sources of Conflict – Help users to identify the specific tangible causes of any conflicts they are experiencing. In other words, get beyond emotions and stereotypes as quickly as possible, and get to the roots of any problems that exist.
7. Work with Affected Users – Work with all parties involved to reach mutually agreeable solutions to these specific issues. Users who are not involved as part of the solution are more likely to be part of the problem now and in the future.
8. Promote Trail Etiquette – Minimize the possibility that any particular trail contact will result in conflict by actively and aggressively promoting responsible trail behavior.
9. Encourage Positive Interaction Among Different Users – Trail users are usually not as different from one another as they believe. Providing positive interactions both on and off the trail will help break down barriers and stereotypes, and build understanding, good will, and cooperation.
10. Favor ‘Light-Handed Management’ – Use the most ‘light-handed approaches’ that will achieve objectives. This is essential in order to provide the freedom of choice and natural environments that are so important to trail-based recreation. Intrusive design and coercive management are not compatible with high-quality experiences.
11. Plan and Act Locally – Whenever possible, address issues regarding multiple-use trails at the local level. This allows greater sensitivity to local needs and provides better flexibility for addressing difficult issues on a case-by-case basis.
12. Monitor Progress – Monitor the ongoing effectiveness of the decisions made and programs implemented.

—ROGER MOORE, Conflicts on Multiple-Use Trails: Synthesis of the Literature and State of the Practice, 1994


Click to find over 2,000 additional Trail Quotes  arranged loosely into 60 subjects. I want the Trail Quotes to be a readable source for inspiring, challenging, and amusing information and knowledge; as well as a reliable, easy-to-use reference work for finding the precise wording, author, date, and source of the trail quotation.

Jim Schmid’s Trail Quote of the Day #835- Jan 25, 2018

Sandra-Schmid-kissing-tree-at-Sequoia-Nat-Park-CA-2010

Sandra-Schmid-kissing-tree-at-Sequoia-Nat-Park-CA-2010

Trail conflicts can and do occur among different user groups, among different users within the same user group, and as a result of factors not related to users’ trail activities at all. In fact, no actual contact among trail users need occur for conflict to be felt.

—ROGER MOORE, Conflicts on Multiple-Use Trails: Synthesis of the Literature and State of the Practice, 1994


Click to find over 2,000 additional Trail Quotes  arranged loosely into 60 subjects. I want the Trail Quotes to be a readable source for inspiring, challenging, and amusing information and knowledge; as well as a reliable, easy-to-use reference work for finding the precise wording, author, date, and source of the trail quotation.

Jim Schmid’s Trail Quote of the Day #409 – Nov 25, 2016

Jim-Schmid-Lower-Cadillac-Trail-workday-Tallahassee-FL-10-14-2007

Jim-Schmid-Lower-Cadillac-Trail-workday-Tallahassee-FL-10-14-2007

….volunteerism is not a fad but a viable, long term solution to providing many recreation services. The success and importance of volunteer activities today are far exceeded by their potential for the future. Volunteer programs require a great deal of effort to initiate and sustain, and they are not free. However, when approached properly, these programs can have broad long term benefits that far outweigh costs.

—ROGER MOORE, Appalachian Mountain Club, in President’s Commission on Americans Outdoors, Report and Recommendations to the President of the United States, 1986


Click to find over 2,000 additional Trail Quotes  arranged loosely into 60 subjects. I want the Trail Quotes to be a readable source for inspiring, challenging, and amusing information and knowledge; as well as a reliable, easy-to-use reference work for finding the precise wording, author, date, and source of the trail quotation.

Jim Schmid’s Trail Quote of the Day #344 – Sept 21, 2016

Mike-Criss-and-Jim-Schmid-at-Pro-Bike-Conference-Colorado-Springs-CO-1982

Mike-Criss-and-Jim-Schmid-at-Pro-Bike-Conference-Colorado-Springs-CO-1982

Partnerships with volunteer organizations offer the agency the advantage of cost savings on recruiting, training and supervising volunteers. Also, volunteer organizations provide continuity year after year. This arrangement offers the volunteers an identity and satisfaction of being able to ‘own’ meaningful responsibilities rather than simply perform disjointed tasks. The volunteer group does, though, need to earn the respect and trust of the agency by running successful programs and managing the continuity of service.

—NELSON OBUS, ROGER MOORE, and THOMAS MARTORELLI, Partnerships for Public Lands, Appalachia, number 182, 1986


Click to find over 2,000 additional Trail Quotes  arranged loosely into 60 subjects. I want the Trail Quotes to be a readable source for inspiring, challenging, and amusing information and knowledge; as well as a reliable, easy-to-use reference work for finding the precise wording, author, date, and source of the trail quotation.